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Notes of Music, organic gardening, eco-building, Permaculture designs and explorations along this Path in Life.

2016-04-20

Wire with spurs and Permacultural views

Quick english translation on the go... as the daily practice meditation job is pruning grapevines according to one specific way of tying down the new branches that are going to bear fruit this year: here is the "wire with spurs", in italian "cordone speronato".

Double "cordone speronato"

In the italian technical language of pruning fruit trees, we call a "sperone" (spur) a short portion of branch that (1) has already grown one year and that (2) carries fruiting buds, since grapevines bear fruit on two years old branches. 

It's enough to leave just two or three buds on each spur and cut all the rest. The main branch that carries all the spurs is tightened horizontally along the main wire (in italian "cordone"). This way the branch holding the spurs gets thick and strong year after year, until it needs to be refreshed when it's not vigorous enough.

Two branches of two neighboring plants "hold hands" together, in this gorgeous plot in the middle of the woods. 




The vineyard starts to get a completely different look... on the left the plant still need to be pruned this way. We are definitely late with this job as the buds have fully opened already. Luckily it's the last vineyard to tie down!


Each plant is different and every junction between neighboring plants could be studied and enhanced more and more, each season. It is surely possible to sculpt living edible fences, with arches, tight walls and shades... marrying neighboring plants so that they could be woven together! Of course not here in this commercial operation where I am working... but on plants that I'll be able to follow up closely. I am very inspired by this method.



Notice the paper-twist kind of ties... definitely NOT my favorite compared to tying with young willow wicker branches. It's quick for sure doing it like this but are we properly considering all the rusty iron debris dropped on the ground from old broken ties? Year after year... I guess we're not. 





Good job, great inspiration anyway. Giving big thanks for the all experience gathered. Soon it's going to be time to put it in action with some daring experiments: soon you'll see what I mean.

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